Bagheera Jenkins.

Ask me anything   Of the universe. Not simply in it.

twitter.com/themakeda:

    wapiti3:

    Natural history of the infusion animals especially after Ehrenberg’s observations. ; By Kutorga, S. (Stepan), 1805 - 186 on Flickr.

    explanation of plates > www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/23949#page/23/mode/1up Publication info Carlsruhe,C.T. Groossche Buchdr.,1841.
    BHL Collections:
    MBLWHOI Library, Woods Hole

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 379 notes
    scinerds:

Tiny, Logical Robots Injected into Cockroaches


  Nanotechnology just got a little bit smarter.
  
  At the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Israel’s Bar-Ilan University, Ido Bachelet led a team of scientists in building tiny robots that can respond to chemical cues and operate inside a living animal. More than that, they can operate as logic gates, essentially acting as real computers.
  
  That gives the nanobots — on the order of nanometers, or one-billionth of a meter — the ability to follow specific instructions, making them programmable. Such tiny robots could do everything from target tumors to repair tissue damage.
  
  The experimenters used a technique called “DNA origami” to make the robots. DNA comes in a double-helix shape, making long strings. And like yarn, the strings can be linked together to make different shapes. In this case, the researchers knitted together DNA into a kind of folded box with a lid, a robot called an “E” for “effector.” The “lid” opened when certain molecules bumped into it.

    scinerds:

    Tiny, Logical Robots Injected into Cockroaches

    Nanotechnology just got a little bit smarter.

    At the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Israel’s Bar-Ilan University, Ido Bachelet led a team of scientists in building tiny robots that can respond to chemical cues and operate inside a living animal. More than that, they can operate as logic gates, essentially acting as real computers.

    That gives the nanobots — on the order of nanometers, or one-billionth of a meter — the ability to follow specific instructions, making them programmable. Such tiny robots could do everything from target tumors to repair tissue damage.

    The experimenters used a technique called “DNA origami” to make the robots. DNA comes in a double-helix shape, making long strings. And like yarn, the strings can be linked together to make different shapes. In this case, the researchers knitted together DNA into a kind of folded box with a lid, a robot called an “E” for “effector.” The “lid” opened when certain molecules bumped into it.

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 742 notes
    thenewenlightenmentage:

How Medical Nanotech Will Change Humanity Forever
Futurists have long speculated that nanotechnology — the engineering of materials and devices at the molecular scale — will revolutionize virtually every field it touches, medicine being no exception. Here’s what to expect when you have fleets of molecule-sized robots coursing through your veins.
Continue Reading

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    How Medical Nanotech Will Change Humanity Forever

    Futurists have long speculated that nanotechnology — the engineering of materials and devices at the molecular scale — will revolutionize virtually every field it touches, medicine being no exception. Here’s what to expect when you have fleets of molecule-sized robots coursing through your veins.

    Continue Reading

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 456 notes
    thenewenlightenmentage:

Breakthrough Could Lead to ‘Artificial Skin’ That Senses Touch, Humidity and Temperature
July 8, 2013 — Using tiny gold particles and a kind of resin, a team of scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that one day could be integrated into electronic skin, or e-skin. If scientists learn how to attach e-skin to prosthetic limbs, people with amputations might once again be able to feel changes in their environments.
Continue Reading

    thenewenlightenmentage:

    Breakthrough Could Lead to ‘Artificial Skin’ That Senses Touch, Humidity and Temperature

    July 8, 2013 — Using tiny gold particles and a kind of resin, a team of scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that one day could be integrated into electronic skin, or e-skin. If scientists learn how to attach e-skin to prosthetic limbs, people with amputations might once again be able to feel changes in their environments.

    Continue Reading

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 484 notes
    sagansense:

Infrared Imaging Is Coming to Contact Lenses Near You

It’s always good to remind yourself that we as humans only see a very little bit of light. Our slice of the electromagnetic spectrum, the slice known as visible light—sandwiched between the much larger wavelength domains of UV and infrared light—is only about a millionth of the whole range of possible wavelengths that photons exist in. That’s a fun thing to note: we see according to what’s useful for us to see, or what makes sense for us to see given the limitations of biology. But what if we, as would-be post-biological organisms, want to see more of everything, like radio waves or thermal energy hiding in the infrared spectrum? Well, according to research published (but not yet online) today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, we can have that ability in a contact lens. All it takes is a bit of super-thin wondermaterial graphene and some cleverness.



Basically, when we detect infrared light using a material, we’re looking for electrons freed from that material by the energy delivered by photons from the Sun (or elsewhere). That movement of particles allows us to reconstruct an infrared environment, giving up the locations of heat-bearing animals in the dark or allowing doctors to monitor blood flow. Current IR detectors aren’t so tiny as to be wearable yet, but the paper argues graphene, essentially single atom-thick chickenwire, is the answer, providing a material small and thin enough to be incorporated into a contact lens.

The catch with graphene, which has long been studied for its photonic potential, is that it only captures about 2.3 percent of whatever light energy it’s bombarded with. This makes it inefficient as a light detector. But, what the new research demonstrates is that it’s possible to sandwich graphene with a very thin sheet of some other material carrying an electrical current. While the inbound light might not shake enough electrons loose from a graphene sheet to be useful alone, with this second current-bearing material, it’s possible to register the spaces left by exiting electrons in the graphene as a change in the electrical field of the second material. The result is still thin and tiny enough to fit on a pinky fingernail.

(1) Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged hexagonally; (2) The band structure of a representative three-dimensional solid (left) is parabolic, with a band gap between the lower-energy valence band and the higher-energy conduction band. The energy bands of two-dimensional graphene (right) are smooth-sided cones, which meet at the Dirac point; (3) A flake of exfoliated graphene 50 micrometers square was placed on layers of silicon dioxide insulator and a silicon gate. The schematic, left, shows how gold contacts were attached to the graphene to apply gate voltage. A 10-micrometer beam of infrared synchrotron radiation (red spot) was focused onto the graphene to measure transmission and reflectance spectra; (4) The conductivity of graphene at different gate voltages, graphed here by curves of different colors, was observed to change with frequency. At high energies (high frequencies), right, conductivity and thus absorption was the same for all voltages, but at energies below a threshold at twice the Fermi energy, the absorption of infrared light decreased. Inset shows the Fermi energy (horizontal lines) and the absorption threshold at twice the Fermi energy (vertical arrows) on a graphene band-structure diagram [source]

"Our work pioneered a new way to detect light," says Zhaohui Zhong, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. "We envision that people will be able to adopt this same mechanism in other material and device platforms."

While military and scientific applications are ready-made, for the rest of us it’s a question of whether we even want to have an entirely new layer of visual experience/stimulus on top of regular old, complex visible light. "If we integrate it with a contact lens or other wearable electronics, it expands your vision," Zhong says. "It provides you another way of interacting with your environment." Which begs the question, Can we even handle another way of interacting with our environment? Or should we just leave infrared to snakes and trippy photographers?

Source: Motherboard

    sagansense:

    Infrared Imaging Is Coming to Contact Lenses Near You

    It’s always good to remind yourself that we as humans only see a very little bit of light. Our slice of the electromagnetic spectrum, the slice known as visible light—sandwiched between the much larger wavelength domains of UV and infrared light—is only about a millionth of the whole range of possible wavelengths that photons exist in. That’s a fun thing to note: we see according to what’s useful for us to see, or what makes sense for us to see given the limitations of biology. But what if we, as would-be post-biological organisms, want to see more of everything, like radio waves or thermal energy hiding in the infrared spectrum? Well, according to research published (but not yet online) today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, we can have that ability in a contact lens. All it takes is a bit of super-thin wondermaterial graphene and some cleverness.

    Basically, when we detect infrared light using a material, we’re looking for electrons freed from that material by the energy delivered by photons from the Sun (or elsewhere). That movement of particles allows us to reconstruct an infrared environment, giving up the locations of heat-bearing animals in the dark or allowing doctors to monitor blood flow. Current IR detectors aren’t so tiny as to be wearable yet, but the paper argues graphene, essentially single atom-thick chickenwire, is the answer, providing a material small and thin enough to be incorporated into a contact lens.

    The catch with graphene, which has long been studied for its photonic potential, is that it only captures about 2.3 percent of whatever light energy it’s bombarded with. This makes it inefficient as a light detector. But, what the new research demonstrates is that it’s possible to sandwich graphene with a very thin sheet of some other material carrying an electrical current. While the inbound light might not shake enough electrons loose from a graphene sheet to be useful alone, with this second current-bearing material, it’s possible to register the spaces left by exiting electrons in the graphene as a change in the electrical field of the second material. The result is still thin and tiny enough to fit on a pinky fingernail.

    (1) Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged hexagonally; (2) The band structure of a representative three-dimensional solid (left) is parabolic, with a band gap between the lower-energy valence band and the higher-energy conduction band. The energy bands of two-dimensional graphene (right) are smooth-sided cones, which meet at the Dirac point; (3) A flake of exfoliated graphene 50 micrometers square was placed on layers of silicon dioxide insulator and a silicon gate. The schematic, left, shows how gold contacts were attached to the graphene to apply gate voltage. A 10-micrometer beam of infrared synchrotron radiation (red spot) was focused onto the graphene to measure transmission and reflectance spectra; (4) The conductivity of graphene at different gate voltages, graphed here by curves of different colors, was observed to change with frequency. At high energies (high frequencies), right, conductivity and thus absorption was the same for all voltages, but at energies below a threshold at twice the Fermi energy, the absorption of infrared light decreased. Inset shows the Fermi energy (horizontal lines) and the absorption threshold at twice the Fermi energy (vertical arrows) on a graphene band-structure diagram [source]

    "Our work pioneered a new way to detect light," says Zhaohui Zhong, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. "We envision that people will be able to adopt this same mechanism in other material and device platforms."

    While military and scientific applications are ready-made, for the rest of us it’s a question of whether we even want to have an entirely new layer of visual experience/stimulus on top of regular old, complex visible light. "If we integrate it with a contact lens or other wearable electronics, it expands your vision," Zhong says. "It provides you another way of interacting with your environment." Which begs the question, Can we even handle another way of interacting with our environment? Or should we just leave infrared to snakes and trippy photographers?

    Source: Motherboard

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 172 notes
    wildcat2030:

Better Condoms through Nanotechnology
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has proven of late to be a spur to developing nanotechnology-based solutions to some of the world’s problems, like a system for sterilizing medical equipment even in places where there is no electricity. The foundation’s latest Grand Challenge Exploration grants are aimed at improving the humble condom. The Gates Foundation granted $100 000 to the University of Manchester to develop a condom in November of last year, reportedly using graphene, that would lead to thinner yet stronger condoms. With the University of Manchester becoming a “hub” for graphene research, it makes sense that any efforts to use graphene for the improvement of condoms would take place there. But the Gates Foundation apparently didn’t want to limit the prospects of improving prophylactics to just graphene. Last week, it was announced that the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have been awarded a $100 000 Grand Challenge grant to develop a better condom using nanotechnology. “We believe that by altering the mechanical forces experienced by the condom, we may ultimately be able to make a thinner condom which reduces friction, thereby reducing discomfort associated with friction [and] increases pleasure, thereby increasing condom use and decreases rates of unwanted pregnancy and infection transmission,” Kim says in a press release. (via Better Condoms through Nanotechnology - IEEE Spectrum)

    wildcat2030:

    Better Condoms through Nanotechnology

    The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has proven of late to be a spur to developing nanotechnology-based solutions to some of the world’s problems, like a system for sterilizing medical equipment even in places where there is no electricity. The foundation’s latest Grand Challenge Exploration grants are aimed at improving the humble condom. The Gates Foundation granted $100 000 to the University of Manchester to develop a condom in November of last year, reportedly using graphene, that would lead to thinner yet stronger condoms. With the University of Manchester becoming a “hub” for graphene research, it makes sense that any efforts to use graphene for the improvement of condoms would take place there. But the Gates Foundation apparently didn’t want to limit the prospects of improving prophylactics to just graphene. Last week, it was announced that the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have been awarded a $100 000 Grand Challenge grant to develop a better condom using nanotechnology. “We believe that by altering the mechanical forces experienced by the condom, we may ultimately be able to make a thinner condom which reduces friction, thereby reducing discomfort associated with friction [and] increases pleasure, thereby increasing condom use and decreases rates of unwanted pregnancy and infection transmission,” Kim says in a press release. (via Better Condoms through Nanotechnology - IEEE Spectrum)

    (via blasphlegme)

    — 4 weeks ago with 130 notes

    ivy-and-twine:

    So I was  going through the outfits and dresses worn to the Met Gala and gathering up my favorites but then Janelle Monae just COMPLETELY AND UTTERLY BLEW EVERYONE ELSE OUT OF THE WATER and now I am completely obsessed with this look. 

    (via virtuouslyvindicated)

    — 2 months ago with 37 notes
    fleurdulys:

The Blue Room - Paul Ranson
1891

    fleurdulys:

    The Blue Room - Paul Ranson

    1891

    (via contemporaryarmor)

    — 2 months ago with 4830 notes
    Tako no ama (octopus and shell diver) x Katsushika Hokusai. 

inspiration.

    Tako no ama (octopus and shell diver) x Katsushika Hokusai.

    inspiration.

    — 4 months ago